Review: Hush by Eishes Chayil

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Hush by Eishes Chayil

Hardcover, 368 pages

Published September 14th 2010 by Walker Books for Young Readers

“Inside the closed community of Borough Park, where most Chassidim live, the rules of life are very clear, determined by an ancient script written thousands of years before down to the last detail—and abuse has never been a part of it. But when thirteen-year-old Gittel learns of the abuse her best friend has suffered at the hands of her own family member, the adults in her community try to persuade Gittel, and themselves, that nothing happened. Forced to remain silent, Gittel begins to question everything she was raised to believe.

A richly detailed and nuanced book, one of both humor and depth, understanding and horror, this story explains a complex world that remains an echo of its past, and illuminates the conflict between yesterday’s traditions and today’s reality.” – Goodreads

My Opinion: It was really great. There are alot of Hebrew words but the final edition will contain a glossary and pronunciation guide. It seems the ultra-orthodox jewish community is very into bigotry when concerned with others and in a way this story sort of reminended of a short story by Ursala K Leguin called “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas”. Because the people sort of look out for themselves in HUSH and ignore the bad things.

I thought that the writing was great. There were some chapters where I didn’t think were necessary. Almost all the chapters are between 2-5 pages in the book.

Overall I really liked the story.

Overall: 4.5 out of 5

Just wanted to say that this was read as an ARC format. I’m not sure as to what kind of changes have been made in the final book.
_______
Gittel feels guilty about what happened to her friend, Devory, when she was 10 years old. She tries to make it right but everytime she tries to talk about it with her mom, her mom tells her never to talk about her again. But Devory comes to visit her every night and Gittel wants to tell what happens.


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  1. But when thirteen-year-old Gittel learns of the abuse her best friend has suffered at the hands of her own family member the adults in her Inside the closed community of Borough Park where most Chassidim live the rules of life are very clear determined by an ancient script written thousands of years before down to the last detailand abuse has never been a part of it. But when thirteen-year-old Gittel learns of the abuse her best friend has suffered at the hands of her own family member the adults in her community try to persuade Gittel and themselves that nothing happened. Forced to remain silent Gittel begins to question everything she was raised to believe.

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